Blog Archives

Let the Public Vote? Be Careful What You Ask For

Should you encourage the public to vote on a new name? Consider this cautionary tale. A British nautical agency asked the citizenry to select a name for its new research vessel, and the winning name emerged as Boaty McBoatface. But

Posted in Public Relations

Getting Employees on Board with a Name Change

So you’re changing your company name. The old Stafko Products Corporation is now Simplex Corporation. You’ve thought about Wall Street, your customers, your suppliers. What about the staff? Here are six steps to get employees on board: 1. Get them

Posted in Public Relations

Humdrum Name, but First-Rate Communication

Once the name was IDS, Investors Diversified Services. Then it became American Express Financial Advisors. And in late 2005, it was spun off and changed again to (very small drum roll, please) Ameriprise Financial Services. Ameriprise. Yep, it’s a humdrum,

Posted in Public Relations

Here’s One Naming Contest That Worked

When it comes to naming contests, color us dubious. We’ve seen too many that have gotten messy and unproductive. Why? The Biggest reason: No clear guidelines or goals for either generating names or picking a winner. But in Las Cruces,

Posted in Public Relations

It’s a Bird, it’s a Plane, it’s Azul

One thing about creating a new company and running a contest to name it: You’re free to interpret the contest results any way you want. JetBlue founder David Neeleman is starting a new Brazilian domestic airline. He landed a name

Posted in Public Relations

Promoting the New Name: A Primer on PR

Adopting a new company name isn’t enough. If an organization is really proud of its new moniker – and it ought to be – then promoting the new identity with all its important constituent publics is a necessity. Here are

Posted in Public Relations

Boeing Plays “Name That Plane” With The Public

We’ve reported before on the use of contests in naming. The maker of Crayola products, for instance, urged crayon enthusiasts to help rename an old color, and name suggestions poured in. Now, for the first time in its history, Boeing

Posted in Public Relations